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What are some signs of a skull fracture?

On Behalf of | Oct 1, 2021 | Serious Injuries |

An automobile crash can inflict a variety of severe injuries, some of which may not manifest right away. Nonetheless, you should be aware of symptoms of a potentially life-threatening injury like head trauma. If you hit your head during a car collision, a skull fracture may occur.

Sometimes a skull fracture will immediately show symptoms that prompt you to seek emergency medical help. In other instances, you may not feel problems until later on.

Visible and obvious signs

Healthline explains some symptoms that may show up soon after a skull fracture. A wound that caused the fracture will likely bleed. A skull fracture may produce pain and swelling at the wound site or intense headaches and migraines in general. You might also experience frequent bouts of vomiting.

Paralysis is another possibility. Some skull fractures produce brain damage which may impact your nervous system and muscles. The degree of paralysis can vary. Some people just experience paralysis in a few limbs. Others may have loss of feeling in both arms and legs. Even full-body paralysis is possible.

Cognitive problems

A skull fracture has the potential to impact your cognitive abilities. You may feel confused about your surroundings. Concentration may become difficult. Skull damage may also distort your emotional state. You could feel irritated at moments when you would usually never feel negative emotions.

A skull injury can also make it hard to stay awake. You may feel drowsy constantly. It is possible you could faint. This could be especially dangerous if you are operating a vehicle or faint in a dangerous location.

Seek help when necessary

Forms of head trauma like a skull fracture are health problems you should deal with as soon as possible. If you recognize a recent auto accident has given you symptoms of a potentially dangerous condition, you know to seek out medical assistance to preserve your life and health.

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